Beagle Bone Questions

Hey,

I had a few questions about the Beagle Bone board:

1. I googled the processor and found that it's talked about at a cost
of $5 in quantity. However, when I checked DigiKey, it was in the 11+
range in quantity. Is the $5 number for much higher quantities or is
the pricing not finalized because the procs are new or???

2. The Beagle Bone board uses an SD card to store the OS. What do you
guys do when you want to turn a design into a production board? I tend
to think the SD wouldn't remain.

3. Lastly, since this is running Angstrom, do you really need to use
the Cloud9 IDE or can you just do straight Javascript? In looking at
Cloud9, the free version puts your source out there while the other
option is web based only which isn't good for dev unless you are
sitting on the web.

Thanks!
Ed

DigiKey has a markup on most of there items because they are actually a stocking distributor. A lot of distributors do not actually stock. I suggest you get in touch with a TI sales person and work the pricing from there.

From a product standpoint micro SD is still valid in that you could switch to managed NAND which uses the same interface. Or you change the design and go with NAND or NOR. The GPMC memory bus is located on the expansion header and you have access to the boot pins which would allow you to design and ad don board and boot form NAND or NOR. You also have the option of creating your own SPI EEPROM which you can boot from as well.

On the third question, I will defer to one of our many SW experts to chime in on that one!

Gerald

It's linux, you are free to do with it what you want.

DigiKey has a markup on most of there items because they are actually a
stocking distributor.

Digikey prices are usually only valid if you're buying low quantity.
Once you want more than onesy-twosy, their costs are higher than what
the market will bear. Digikey is awesome for prototypes but not the
place to go for production volume.

From a product standpoint micro SD is still valid in that you could switch
to managed NAND which uses the same interface. Or you change the design and
go with NAND or NOR. The GPMC memory bus is located on the expansion header
and you have access to the boot pins which would allow you to design and ad
don board and boot form NAND or NOR. You also have the option of creating
your own SPI EEPROM which you can boot from as well.

I also suggest you check out eMMC devices. They're basically SD cards
in a soldered down BGA package. They interface over the MMC bus, the
Linux kernel treats them just like an MMC or SD card so you don't have
to manage the flash. The nice eMMC devices have internal controllers
that are usually more advanced than their SD card counterparts. Think
of them more like a solid state disk with an MMC interface, the
performance can be similar.

The SanDisk iNAND product line or Samsung Fusion eMMC pages can give
you a good high level overview.

http://www.samsung.com/global/business/semiconductor/products/fusionmemory/Products_MoviNAND.html

-Andrew