beaglebone black jtag/pru beginner advice

Hi All,

I’ve just purchased a beaglebone black for the purposes of learning embedded development and
work on some fun robotics personal projects.

I’d like to experiment with real-time processing, rt-linux, etc. And perhaps test/develop some pru
code as well. But this is a personal project, so I can’t really afford to buy expensive TI compilers/IDE
software.

However jtag documentation and options are a little bit overwhelming for a beginner. I’ve even seen
blog posts on the internet suggesting certain jtags to sidestep TI compiler/ide license fees.

Here are some options I’ve come up with;

  1. Buy blackhawk jtag emulator and ti 20-pin and solder pins on BBB.
    http://store.blackhawk-dsp.com/default/usb100v2d-jtag-emulator.html

(and Samtec part number FTR-110-03-G-06)
I think this is free to use with TI CCC IDE. But can I use this with openocd?

  1. try flyswatter2 and jtag kit and solder the pins. This seems a bit more expensive
    and most importantly from online forums I see people not being able to get this working well…
    This seems more for openocd? Can I still use TI CCC IDE with this? Or would this incur license fees?

I apologize if these don’t make sense, since I’ve got this info from random research online.

I’d appreciate any help with this…

Cheers,
Tolga

Hi All,

I’ve just purchased a beaglebone black for the purposes of learning embedded development and
work on some fun robotics personal projects.

I’d like to experiment with real-time processing, rt-linux, etc. And perhaps test/develop some pru
code as well. But this is a personal project, so I can’t really afford to buy expensive TI compilers/IDE
software.

However jtag documentation and options are a little bit overwhelming for a beginner. I’ve even seen
blog posts on the internet suggesting certain jtags to sidestep TI compiler/ide license fees.

Here are some options I’ve come up with;

  1. Buy blackhawk jtag emulator and ti 20-pin and solder pins on BBB.
    http://store.blackhawk-dsp.com/default/usb100v2d-jtag-emulator.html

(and Samtec part number FTR-110-03-G-06)
I think this is free to use with TI CCC IDE. But can I use this with openocd?

  1. try flyswatter2 and jtag kit and solder the pins. This seems a bit more expensive
    and most importantly from online forums I see people not being able to get this working well…
    This seems more for openocd? Can I still use TI CCC IDE with this? Or would this incur license fees?

I apologize if these don’t make sense, since I’ve got this info from random research online.

I’d appreciate any help with this…

There are a number of users on this mailing list who have tried to get openocd working with BBB, but I’m not aware of anyone doing this successfully. I know these users spent weeks working on this and if you consider the opportunity costs, the USB100V2 at $100 is much more cost effective and it just works. Also note, that with CCSV6, you don’t get a Linux aware debugger so you are limited in the things you can do. You get source level debugging and you can set hardware breakpoints, but you don’t get tracing and don’t think about debugging kernel modules because that requires you to understand how Linux loads kernel modules. Also, CCSV6 isn’t thread aware so when you are single stepping, the scheduler might switch switch threads on you and that adds another level of complications. I use Lauterbach which is Linux kernel aware and this make life much easier. It is possible to use CCSV6 for Linux Kernel debugging, but just be aware of the limitations.

Regards,
John

Thanks John. Sounds like USB100v2/CCSV6 will get me started.

Will this work with gdb or ddd on OS X?

Will this work with gdb or ddd on OS X?

No, I don¹t believe it will. GDB or DDD require GDBServer running on the
BBB or you can use an JTAG emulator from Ronetix (PEEDI) or Abatron
(BDI2000) which emulates GDBServer.

Regards,
John

So, there's still a market for my once-upon-a-time project to make an OS X-native debugger with a plug-in architecture for stuff like this...

So, there's still a market for my once-upon-a-time project to make an OS
X-native debugger with a plug-in architecture for stuff like this...

Well, TI are considering releasing CCS on OSX, just not sure when. For now
I would just add a Parallels virtual machine running Ubuntu and run CCSV6
on that. Short of that, I think the project you are proposing to way to
big for just one person.

Regards,
John

Or just buy a cheap netbook, and put Linux on it. Personally, I think this is the best way, much preferable over using a virtual machine. But it does add cost. Unless you get lucky like I did, and get a busted netbook ( bad screen ) for free.

Oh, I find it much less convenient to have another machine to deal with. Parallels integration with OS X is pretty good, although Linux breaks that with its very non-conforming cut & paste. Usually I just ssh into my VM from the OS X Terminal and deal with stuff that way, rarely using a GUI in Linux. TextWrangler can open files over SFTP and makes it almost seem like the file exists locally. I think I can mount the Linux filesystem in the OS X Finder, but haven't really gotten that to work yet.

Still, I like OS X for a reason, and it makes me want to build some of these tools anyway.

I used virtualbox for well over a year on my Windows machine, but prefer to keep it free of “crap”, and virtual machines are not always that great for various aspects of development. It is less convenient when I travel, but I usually do not do any development when I travel anyway.

As for “local files” I prefer to use Samba, and when configured correctly, it does show up as a local drive. Except that it is not :wink: