current solution for JTAG debugging of beagleboard xm?

a client is interested in JTAG debugging of a beagleboard xm and, if
memory serves, one approach once upon a time was described here:

  http://elinux.org/BeagleBoardJTAG

involving tin can tools' flyswatter 2 and openocd. is that still the
best approach these days if one wants to keep things inexpensive?
other options? thanks.

rday

a client is interested in JTAG debugging of a beagleboard xm and, if
memory serves, one approach once upon a time was described here:

http://elinux.org/BeagleBoardJTAG

involving tin can tools' flyswatter 2 and openocd. is that still the
best approach these days if one wants to keep things inexpensive?
other options? thanks.

Hi Robert,

XDS100V2 is less than $100 and the new XDS200 which is faster is about
$200. Both work with Code Composer Studio V5.

Regards,
John

  a client is interested in JTAG debugging of a beagleboard xm and, if
memory serves, one approach once upon a time was described here:

  http://elinux.org/BeagleBoardJTAG

involving tin can tools' flyswatter 2 and openocd. is that still the
best approach these days if one wants to keep things inexpensive?
other options? thanks.

This is still one of the most inexpensive ways to debug BB-XM. I
haven't personally done it in some time though.

i've actually *never* done it, i just wanted to make sure there was
no newer, spiffier way to do it beyond what was documented on that
page.

  if there are any other pages on JTAG debugging that might be
appropriate for the xM, by all means, let me know. thanks.

rday

Well if you prefer non open source solution and prefer a feature rich IDE(CCS5.X) backed by the vendor (TI) @ $79 xdsv2usb is the only way. I trust your google skills starting from here

http://elinux.org/BeagleBoard

http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/XDS100

code composer jtag support uses a .gel file to initialize processor and memory so you will have to google around for the Beagle Board one or uses the bootloader to initialize things and then grab control I dont recommend that approach

The industry trend now is jtag over usb with no need for a connector the bone white supports this the Beagleboard and Panda and BBB need connectors

the XDS100v3 looks interesting and definitely affordable ... i'm
assuming it's usable under linux as i have a *passing* acquaintance
with Code Composer Studio running on windows so i hope this is still
usable under linux, specifically fedora 20 for now.

  unless anyone has any specific objections to this item, i'll order
it and start playing.

rday

Well if you prefer non open source solution and prefer a feature
rich IDE(CCS5.X) backed by the vendor (TI) @ $79 xdsv2usb is the
only way. I trust your google skills starting from here

http://elinux.org/BeagleBoard

http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/XDS100

code composer jtag support uses a .gel file to initialize processor
and memory so you will have to google around for the Beagle Board
one or uses the bootloader to initialize things and then grab
control I dont recommend that approach

The industry trend now is jtag over usb with no need for a connector
the bone white supports this the Beagleboard and Panda and BBB need
connectors

the XDS100v3 looks interesting and definitely affordable ... i'm
assuming it's usable under linux as i have a *passing* acquaintance
with Code Composer Studio running on windows so i hope this is still
usable under linux, specifically fedora 20 for now.

I¹ve used it with CCSV5 running under Ubuntu.

admitting i know next to nothing about JTAG debugging, can you
clarify a couple things?

  first, i need to do some JTAG debugging *strictly* on a beagleboard
xM in a few weeks and, for that, it seems that my most convenient
solution is tin can tools' flyswatter 2 and adapter (which i believe i
even have somewhere buried in a drawer, which makes it *really*
convenient. :slight_smile:

  next, given that i have that, is there still value in purchasing a
TI XDS100v2? i have no problem investing in more toys as long as they
provide additional value.

  i guess i really need to find a good JTAG tutorial somewhere and
start reading ...

rday

Well if you prefer non open source solution and prefer a feature
rich IDE(CCS5.X) backed by the vendor (TI) @ $79 xdsv2usb is the
only way. I trust your google skills starting from here

http://elinux.org/BeagleBoard

http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php/XDS100

code composer jtag support uses a .gel file to initialize processor
and memory so you will have to google around for the Beagle Board
one or uses the bootloader to initialize things and then grab
control I dont recommend that approach

The industry trend now is jtag over usb with no need for a connector
the bone white supports this the Beagleboard and Panda and BBB need
connectors

admitting i know next to nothing about JTAG debugging, can you
clarify a couple things?

first, i need to do some JTAG debugging *strictly* on a beagleboard
xM in a few weeks and, for that, it seems that my most convenient
solution is tin can tools' flyswatter 2 and adapter (which i believe i
even have somewhere buried in a drawer, which makes it *really*
convenient. :slight_smile:

next, given that i have that, is there still value in purchasing a
TI XDS100v2? i have no problem investing in more toys as long as they
provide additional value.

i guess i really need to find a good JTAG tutorial somewhere and
start reading ...

Hi Robert,

It really depends on what you are trying to achieve. If you want to
understand the workings of JTAG, then flyswatter is a good solution. If
like the rest of us you just want to debug u-boot or kernel code, then
XDS100V2 or XDS200 together with CCSV5 is a good solution. One thing to
note, although you can debug Linux Kernel code, CCSV5 isn¹t kernel aware
so there are limitations in what you can do. Strangely, CCSV4 was Linux
Kernel aware, but TI decided that CCSV5 stay as close to the standard
Eclipse IDE as possible and avoid extensive customization required for
making it Linux Kernel aware. Also, with the addition of DWARF4, it is now
possible to see most of the local variables. If you want kernel aware
debugging, then I suggest you use ARM DS-5 or Lauterbach, but these are
expensive solutions. I have also used PEEDI which is a very good solutions
and is Linux Kernel aware and uses standard Eclipse IDE.

Regards,
John

Just curious, but why would we need to buy TI specific JTAG emulators, and software ?

Honestly there has to be a better solution. Last I looked a single seat for CCS was $400 . . . that is a bit pricey . . .

Just curious, but why would we need to buy TI specific JTAG emulators, and software ?

Honestly there has to be a better solution. Last I looked a single seat for CCS was $400 . . . that is a bit pricey . . .

Time value of money and opportunity costs. If you spend a few hours trying to get any other solutions working, you have spent more than $400. I’d rather work on my project than trying to work on something I have no experience or skills. If you have a more cost effective solutions, please share.

Regards,
John

My own time to me is free . . . then while CCS may work, and well for you… I have plenty of hand on with the software since CCS v4.x up until v5.3.x. But without me getting into too much detail. Let us just say the software is not for me. I already have my own toolchain / IDE setup, and I do not have any problems with using GDB from the command line on Windows or Linux. Also I already own a J-Link emulator . . . but have limited hands on with it.