DNI and 0 Ohms Resistors

I have recently been re-creating the BB-xM (RevA3) schematics. Through
the design process I have come across a large number of components
listed as "DNI" or "Do Not Inlcude" in the design. Along those same
lines, there is a significant amount of 0 ohm resistors in the design
as well. How should I handle these components for a production board?
Should they be ignored and removed from the design, or should they be
included "just in case" on the final design?

If you want the same functionality as the current board, leave them out if they are not installed. If you think you may nee dthem for later, leave them in. Once the board is done, it is hard to put them in later. Not knowing exactly what you want to do with your design, it is hard to say for sure. But, I would leave them out.

Gerald

Dont know about the do not include components but the 0 ohms resistors
are very essential in designs. They help in debugging the board. Once
you have the board etched and all the ic s in place the 0 ohms
resistors are not soldered initially. These points provide "test
points" to the schematic. It will tell you whether you are getting
correct voltage before giving to the main ic s . Once the test points
are verified you can now solder the 0 ohms resistors. Think of these
as breakpoints in hardware, you wont go forward until you are done
with the previous voltage drop and current rating measurements.

regards
Sam

We used to use those zeros on boards where the resistor was optional (depending on the model of the board) and the robot needed something to pick and place every time. It couldn’t just pick up a wire, so there was a bin of those special “resistors” that look and feel like a resistor to the robot.

Every board got every “resistor”, but depending on the exact model not every resistor on every board provided resistance.

That was 10 years ago. They might make better robots now, but the zero-Ohm is how we kept it happy.

Just to say that there might be uses that want a resistor there and other uses where it doesn’t apply.

Or for testing. That sounds good too. :slight_smile:

Jeremy

I was confused on this issue too. Do you solve it now?