Has anyone made a BeagleBone to Arduino shield socket adapter ?

There are so many Arduino shields available I was surprised that a Google search did not find any BeagleBone-to-Arduino-shield-socket adapters. Arduino shields are so inexpensive, for example this $59 2.8" color LCD resistive touchscreen.

http://www.adafruit.com/products/376

Is it just not practical? Or am I using the wrong keywords for my searching?

Thanks in advance,

-Ed

One of the issues is that Arduino is 5V and BeagleBone is 3.3V. That requires level shifters on all lines, which is cumbersome and can be expensive. But, it could be done. There are boards that have an actual Arduino style processor on a board and connects to the Beaglebone processor. I am not sure if there are any that have the actual shield headers on them.

Gerald

Thank you Gerald!

I suppose once you add the cost of the level shifters to a BeagleBone-to-Arduino-shield-adapter there may not be much cost savings remaining as compared to the cost of the Arduino cape by itself.

-Ed

That is what I ran into. Be cheaper to just add the processor and level shift the serial port.

Gerald

… or use a 3v3 arduino and shields that will run at 3v3. While other than LiPo powered stuff and that being circa 3.7ish per cell I can’t see why the industry has moved to lower voltages and thus lower noise margin. that said as the industry seems to have largely moved to 3v3 logic, I’ve followed with it and run most of my arduino stuff at 3v3 as well. it avoids having to do level conversion and makes interfacing with a wide variety of parts easy, not to mention the many 3v3 parts available. Look at the seeduino boards, most of them are 3v3 & 5v switchable as well as many versions of the arduino being available as 3v3 io.

Eric

… or use a 3v3 arduino and shields that will run at 3v3.

Thanks.

While other than LiPo powered stuff and that being circa 3.7ish per cell I can’t see why the industry has moved to lower voltages and thus lower noise margin. that said as the industry seems to have largely moved to 3v3 logic, I’ve followed with it and run most of my arduino stuff at 3v3 as well. it avoids having to do level conversion and makes interfacing with a wide variety of parts easy, not to mention the many 3v3 parts available. Look at the seeduino boards, most of them are 3v3 & 5v switchable as well as many versions of the arduino being available as 3v3 io.

I think your are right 3.3V. It is all about saving watts and heat for the battery operated mobile devices. However even for desktop applications heat and power savings are important especially when it comes to high clock rates. Intel CPU core logic has been running at low voltages for years I assume to keep themselves from burning up at those > 1GHz clock rates. I do not know what the clock rate is for a typical Arduino.

Thank you for the tips!

-Ed

We’ve created a solution: it comes with software configurable level shifters that operate with 3.3V and 5V shields. The adapter provides any pinmux configuration except the analog comparator on pins AIN0 and AIN1 (This is an alternative muxing on D6 and D7). Any PWM, Timer, Digital Out/In, Anaglog in (up to 5V), SPI and I2C pin can be served.

http://elinux.org/Impressx:Arduino_Shield_Adapter

Best Regards,

Daniel

Hi Ed,

there is a solution: http://elinux.org/Impressx:Arduino_Shield_Adapter
It’s not yet available for purchase but it’s possible to pre-register to get updates in it.