Mapping BBB as a Drive on Windows &

Hi All,

I would like to map my BBB Linux file system as a drive under windows. I have managed to do this quite easily on Ubuntu, but struggling on Windows.

It is really handy to do all file editing / backing up code on the host machine.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Regards
Andy

Assuming you are using Samba, it should work. Can you access it via “network neighborhood” on Windows? If you can’t that explains why Map Drive won’t work either. I also recall getting much better error messages when connecting through network neighborhood.

One thing that sometimes trips me up, is that at least with the older versions of Windows I’ve used (7 & older) the Workgroups have to match on both machines. I also recall having issues with the Windows 7 “Home Group” settings.

I’ve zero experience with Windows 8 and newer.

If you are networking your Windows machine and your BBB with the “USB Ethernet gadget” connection there may be issues there, see if the BBB on a wired Ethernet connection can mount on your Windows box.

How I do this is share an NFS share from Linux, and then map the driver in Windows. To do this, I use an intermediary Debian system, which provides the NFS share, from which the beaglebone simply mounts this NFS share. The intermediary system also shares the same directory out to the Windows system via Samba. Which makes it very easy to write code “remotely” on the Windows, for the beaglebone. Then of course I simply compile locally to the beaglebone using gcc.

You could even setup A Samba server on the beaglebone directly, but the problem with that. Is that the shared Media will be flash media.

I suppose another option on the beaglebone, would be to create a tmpfs, and then share that out via Samba. It could not be much bigger than 256M in size, but It could work.

I am using the USB IP direct connection between my BBB and PC.

Hi
If u mount a linux file system in Windows (eg with samba AKA cifs)
then windows will mess up all permissions, cannot distinguish properly
between capital and lower case letters. hello.c and HeLlO.C in Windows
is the same file;(.

However, there is a workaround:
If you can connect with ssh, you can as well connect with the sftp and
scp protocol to BB(B). _and_ there are many good and free sftp clients
available for windows.
Tip: have a look @ winscp, connect with sftp and right click on the
file u want to edit, u can even choose your favorite editor...
HTH
didi

Hi
If u mount a linux file system in Windows (eg with samba AKA cifs)
then windows will mess up all permissions, cannot distinguish properly
between capital and lower case letters. hello.c and HeLlO.C in Windows
is the same file;(.

What in Linux doesn’t Windows screw up ? But this is unimportant, if you keep your access limited to a single main directory, that does not belong to root. As far as case goes . . .personally I’ve never seen that as anything important. name your file “hello1.c” if you want to make a different file . . . which is also clearer.

But as with anything, you can work around anything, if you put your mind to it. Personally I much prefer being able to access external media as if it were a local drive. e.g. there is no third party application to use, as it’s handled internally by windows explorer. Since, Win95 . . .

@ andrew

I am using the USB IP direct connection between my BBB and PC.

So what’s your point ? Ethernet is Ethernet. No matter if the physical connector is USB, or RJ45. The only real difference is, since you’re directly connected to your Windows machine, if you were to do what I suggested above, and have an NFS share via Linux. That you’d have to run a Linux virtual machine on Windows. Which honestly is more work, and maybe unnecessary for your given situation.

The newer debian images do not use a FAT partition like the Angstrom, and older Debian images did. So sharing an ext* partition wont work.

The newer debian images do not use a FAT partition like the Angstrom, and older Debian images did. So sharing an ext* partition wont work.

That is, sharing an ext3/4 partition wont work via g_mass_storage to Windows.

Connecting like this, your Windows system usually ends up on a different subnet from the BBB, with the Windows system routing between them so there may be issues with the file sharing default settings. That is why I asked if you can see your BBB in Network Neighborhood on your Windows box. The USB Gadget ends up on 192.168.7.2 while your Windows box has what ever IP your ISP interface box assigns it.

If you have SAMBA working between Ubuntu and your BBB it should work for Windows too, but you may need some configuration changes on Windows and/or your BBB if you can’t see your BBB in Network Neighborhood. If you have a spare port on your router (ISP access box), shutdown the BBB and use an Ethernet cable to connect your BBB to it, and see if it then shows up in Network Neighborhood when the BBB reboots (this way they will both be on the same subnet).

Do you have “Internet Connection Sharing” enabled on your Windows host so the BBB can access the Internet (for things like apt-get update)?

Like I’ve said, I’ve not kept up with Windows, so I can’t be much more help with the Windows side configuration if you are newer than Windows 7.

I’ve used SAMBA to share ext2/3/4 Linux file systems with Windows for a very long time without any significant issues, the convenience far out ways what you lose from having hello.c and heLIO.C forced to be the same file and other minor path and file naming convention differences.

If you are not running SAMBA on your BBB (its not installed by default on any of the recent images I’ve tried) I’ve no idea what you’ve been doing.