rev b5, no kb/mouse

Hi,

I've dusted off a rev B5 board that I had laying around for a new
project, and I'm trying to install Ubuntu-arm 10.10 on it. It gets
all the way to the ubuntu configuration welcome screen, but it doesn't
find the keyboard or mouse. The beagle is powered by it's own power
supply. I've tried two different USB 2.0 hubs, powered by their own
power supplies. Connection is a usb mini-a to mini-b cable, mini-a
end is connected to the Beagle. I've tried two different mice.

What next?

Unfortunately, the Ubuntu image turns off console messages to either
the serial console or the screen. *sheesh* -- if somebody has a clue
about how to re-enable one or both of those, please share it.

-dave

Hi Dave,

Based on the info it sound's like your using Canonical's Image.. (no
serial messages, create user login.) But correct me if i'm wrong..

With the way they have their kernel setup, you need to load one of the
gadget drivers to force load/start the musb port.. This can be
accomplished by editing the boot.scr and adding the module you want to
load* and while there enable the serial output.. (PS, they only
really support the C4 and up (with the ehci) port..)

* i know angstrom has had boot scripts in the past that could do this,
i just don't remember off hand the syntax..

Or you can just run one of my demo images here:
http://elinux.org/BeagleBoardUbuntu#Demo_Image

As i have a number of older musb/OTG only beagle's still in use and i
need the musb/otg working on bootup..

Regards,

RCN's image came right up, no problems. My conclusion is that
Canonical's images no longer work with B-rev boards, or in any case
do not enable USB host mode on B5.

Now that I have a booting board... what .deb package repo's are
compatible? I want to add a few things, like rsync, and git for
starters.

-dave

Other then the kernel image in the repo's anything built in the repo
should at-least install and start to run.. Depending on what you
actually install, you may run out of memory fast (xfce/etc) and would
need to add a swap file....

Regards

Now that I have a booting board... what .deb package repo's are
compatible? I want to add a few things, like rsync, and git for
starters.

Other then the kernel image in the repo's anything built in the repo

'the repo' ... umm.... I hate to be dense, but your URL shortener
left out the link :slight_smile:

So, are you saying that I can pretty much use anything I find
in the Debian Squeeze armel repo? If I look in the Ubuntu
Maverick repo repo I don't see much built for armel.

should at-least install and start to run.. Depending on what you
actually install, you may run out of memory fast (xfce/etc) and would
need to add a swap file....

I have a couple questions on this but I'll start a new thread so that
the topic title is more helpful.

Thanks,
-dave

Now that I have a booting board... what .deb package repo's are
compatible? I want to add a few things, like rsync, and git for
starters.

Other then the kernel image in the repo's anything built in the repo

'the repo' ... umm.... I hate to be dense, but your URL shortener
left out the link :slight_smile:

As for the 'the repo' i'm assuming the 'repo' your allready subscribed
to in /etc/apt/sources.list

For example with maverick:

deb http://ports.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-ports maverick main universe multiverse
deb http://ports.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-ports maverick-updates main
universe multiverse

You may or may not have 'universe & multiverse' enabled so double
check.. run "sudo apt-get update" after changing it to refresh your
deb database..

So, are you saying that I can pretty much use anything I find
in the Debian Squeeze armel repo? If I look in the Ubuntu
Maverick repo repo I don't see much built for armel.

Where are you looking? Ubuntu's armel is not on Ubuntu's main server
(the one used for x86 and mirrored worldwide)..

It's on the "ports.ubuntu.com" server in the uk...

http://ports.ubuntu.com/

should at-least install and start to run.. Depending on what you
actually install, you may run out of memory fast (xfce/etc) and would
need to add a swap file....

I have a couple questions on this but I'll start a new thread so that
the topic title is more helpful.

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SwapFaq

Regards,

<snip>

Where are you looking? Ubuntu's armel is not on Ubuntu's main server
(the one used for x86 and mirrored worldwide)..

I've just been looking on the web page indices -- haven't actually tried
to apt-get anything yet. So I'm only going by what the web catalog
reports.

It's on the "ports.ubuntu.com" server in the uk...

http://ports.ubuntu.com/

OK, great! Thanks for the pointer.

-dave

My questions aren't so much about what swap is and how to add it -- my first
encounter with *nix was in the 1970's -- but about about how to
accomplish that with an SDCard image. (I'm a Beagle n00b, surely,
but I've been around the track a few laps with Linux.)

Now that the card has been booted and the / partition expanded, making
a swap partition will require partitioning and resizing. Does it make sense
to go back to step 1 and create an SDcard image with swap on it before
first boot? Or is there an easy way to resize file system partitions with the
tools on your image?

And what about swapping to SDCard versus flash wear? Is swapping to the
flash going to kill it at some point?

Anyway... I'm not convinced I need swap... top reported that a freshly booted
system 'doing nothing' was consuming only about 30% of the memory. I don't
plan to run X too often, although I'd like the capability.

-dave

should at-least install and start to run.. Depending on what you
actually install, you may run out of memory fast (xfce/etc) and would
need to add a swap file....

I have a couple questions on this but I'll start a new thread so that
the topic title is more helpful.

1.
What are the 'easy' options for light-weight X-windows on a Beagle?
It looks like XFCE is popular. Is anyone using LXDE, or would I end
up being the only user and building it all from scratch?

2.
My Beagle is going to live in a mobile robot. So, a lot of the time, I
don't even want to start X of any kind. There are some times when
for development/debug I'd like to plug in a monitor/kb/mouse
and be able to do a startx. There are also times when I would want
to have an X application running on the Beagle, with the display
set back to an X server on another machine on the WiFi network.
Am I right in thinking that the X server is the big memory
consumer of the X windows system, so if I am running an X
client application with the display set to another machine then the
memory pressure due to X should be minimal?

TIA,
-dave

should at-least install and start to run.. Depending on what you
actually install, you may run out of memory fast (xfce/etc) and would
need to add a swap file....

I have a couple questions on this but I'll start a new thread so that
the topic title is more helpful.

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SwapFaq

My questions aren't so much about what swap is and how to add it -- my first
encounter with *nix was in the 1970's -- but about about how to
accomplish that with an SDCard image. (I'm a Beagle n00b, surely,
but I've been around the track a few laps with Linux.)

Now that the card has been booted and the / partition expanded, making
a swap partition will require partitioning and resizing. Does it make sense
to go back to step 1 and create an SDcard image with swap on it before
first boot? Or is there an easy way to resize file system partitions with the
tools on your image?

You can do a 'swap file' and not worry about resizing...

And what about swapping to SDCard versus flash wear? Is swapping to the
flash going to kill it at some point?

eventually yeah.. i have a couple embedded system's that have been
running swap on flash for a good couple years.. there still up, but
they don't do much either, so not many read/writes...

Anyway... I'm not convinced I need swap... top reported that a freshly booted
system 'doing nothing' was consuming only about 30% of the memory. I don't
plan to run X too often, although I'd like the capability.

If your not going to run ubuntu's X (xfce/gnome/kde/etc), swap is not
really worth it on the sd card... (those meta packages on ubuntu
armel are still too bloated for low memory system's..)

Regards,

should at-least install and start to run.. Depending on what you
actually install, you may run out of memory fast (xfce/etc) and would
need to add a swap file....

I have a couple questions on this but I'll start a new thread so that
the topic title is more helpful.

1.
What are the 'easy' options for light-weight X-windows on a Beagle?
It looks like XFCE is popular. Is anyone using LXDE, or would I end
up being the only user and building it all from scratch?

LXDE was definitely interesting in the "jaunty" armel release, but the
last time I tried to install it (lucid?), it brought in way to many
gnome lib's* so ended up being slower then xfce... (* that may have
changed in maverick, so it would be worth testing..)

2.
My Beagle is going to live in a mobile robot. So, a lot of the time, I
don't even want to start X of any kind. There are some times when
for development/debug I'd like to plug in a monitor/kb/mouse
and be able to do a startx. There are also times when I would want
to have an X application running on the Beagle, with the display
set back to an X server on another machine on the WiFi network.
Am I right in thinking that the X server is the big memory
consumer of the X windows system, so if I am running an X
client application with the display set to another machine then the
memory pressure due to X should be minimal?

Use x-forwarding over ssh.. I'd point to a link to google, but
there's not really one example/main site, as it's been around for
ever...

google: "ssh x forwarding"

Regards,

I'm pretty sure it's just:

ssh -X <remote host> <app>

That should start <app> on the remote host and redirect its display to
your system. As long as you can ssh into the BeagleBoard I'm pretty
sure this would work.

Should work with OpenSSH. Not sure if there are feature limited
versions of ssh around that make it more difficult than this.

1.
What are the 'easy' options for light-weight X-windows on a Beagle?
It looks like XFCE is popular. Is anyone using LXDE, or would I end
up being the only user and building it all from scratch?

Matchbox is pretty lightweight. About as lightweight as you'll find.
The newer releases may be more feature-rich but the original 0.1.x
releases (panel, window manager, desktop, etc.) are pretty small.

2.
My Beagle is going to live in a mobile robot. So, a lot of the time, I
don't even want to start X of any kind. There are some times when
for development/debug I'd like to plug in a monitor/kb/mouse
and be able to do a startx. There are also times when I would want
to have an X application running on the Beagle, with the display
set back to an X server on another machine on the WiFi network.

Why not just ssh into the box and run "screen". Lots of terminals on
the BeagleBoard without the overhead of X. Unless there is some
GUI-oriented app on the board that you must have to manage the board's
distro, this seems a more lightweight solution.

Just a thought.

My questions aren't so much about what swap is and how to add it -- my first
encounter with *nix was in the 1970's -- but about about how to
accomplish that with an SDCard image. (I'm a Beagle n00b, surely,
but I've been around the track a few laps with Linux.)

As Robert pointed out, swap would work but with an SD card the writes
are slower than a disk so performance takes a hit (how much of hit I
suppose is subjective). If its just you and your aware of the issue it
may not matter. If its a product for lots of users and they don't care
about the issues, it may be important.

The question to ask is: are you running BeagleBoard as a tiny desktop or
as a specific-task-oriented machine. If the former you may need swap.
If the latter, you may want to avoid it.

Now that the card has been booted and the / partition expanded, making
a swap partition will require partitioning and resizing. Does it make sense
to go back to step 1 and create an SDcard image with swap on it before
first boot? Or is there an easy way to resize file system partitions with the
tools on your image?

It's an SD card - re: its tiny, so repartitioning it takes very little
effort. I'd rebuild the SD card partitions and add a swap partition.
Then reload your other images to their respective partitions again. You
may need to do some mucking around with the init scripts in your rootfs
to find the swap partition or the boot script if you change the default
location of the rootfs.

And what about swapping to SDCard versus flash wear? Is swapping to the
flash going to kill it at some point?

I always thought it would be but it seems to be general consensus that
this is much less of an issue these days with wear-leveling hardware in
SD cards and larger storage capacities. Still, I'm building my system
to avoid writing to the SD card as much as possible (re: avoiding swap).
At the moment, it still seems (IMHO) like good practice for embedded
systems.