UART connection question

I have a few questions regarding the UARTs on the Beaglebone Black & Green.

What is a good resource for writing programs for the uarts? Which programming language would be the best to write uart applications in C++, Python, or Java?

Is it possible to send data between the uarts without them being physically connected?

Thank you in advance for your help.

Mike

What is a good resource for writing programs for the uarts? Which programming language would be the best to write uart applications in C++, Python, or Java?

This does not matter, from all languages it is just communicating with the related device.

Is it possible to send data between the uarts without them being physically connected?

Wireless UART is not yet invented…

What is a good resource for writing programs for the uarts? Which programming language would be the best to write uart applications in C++, Python, or Java?

This does not matter, from all languages it is just communicating with the related device.

Is it possible to send data between the uarts without them being physically connected?

Wireless UART is not yet invented…

That is not strictly speaking true. There are several devices that take UART data on one side, transmit that data over wireless and then output the same UART data on the other wireless node. Search Google for "uart wireless transceiver”

Regards,
John

You are going about this with blinders on. Unless you are writing baremetal or
kernel code (which most of the languages you listed are not really targeted
toward), you should be asking about writing to serial devices.

You are on Linux and the Linux interfaces for serial ports (which UARTs are)
are pretty much the same on all platforms (be it PC or or the Beagle's). In a
nutshell, they appears as a character device. So what you should be
researching is how to program a serial character device in Linux (or Unix).
Depending the level of control you need, it can range from as simple as
writing to stdout and redirecting to opening up special files and issuing
ioctls.

Once again, if you take off the blinders, the answer to physically
disconnected "uarts" would make more sense. Consider SPP on Bluetooth wireless
which shares the same programming interface as any other serial port.

Ok, but seriously, these are great questions.

Standard for this kind of stuff is python (apparently). But I think C.

No such thing as a wireless UART in that a UART stands for “Universal Asychronous Receiver/Transmitter” and its a chip that outputs a TTL signal that requires wires to transmit the information to other TTL devices. BUT I get the point of your question.

If you are looking for a wireless link I would recommend wifi with a BBBW. You just have unerring faith that the TCP/IP stack is there. And then you just communicate over that. However the Zigbee guys might have a point.

(faux arrogantly) I mean let’s be real, right? :wink:

Just been doing a little experimenting.

My BBBW comes stock Angstrom a hot spot (sans internet) that can be connected to quickly (with passkey “BeagleBone”, ip address 182.168.7.2) that has a range the same as stock wifi (about 200 ft indoors, 400 ft outdoors) that you could socket over. Was thinking how you would push serial data across the wireless TCP/IP link (like with two BBBW’s…kind of expensive around $150 for 2 BBBW’s) but if you needed a quick-and-dirty serial between two close locations wirelessly this is definitely the way to do it. Just write two programs/libraries that establish a socket connection across and push serial data across it. A programmatic solution.

Its actually solid on the latest BBBW’s (just tested mine tonight). Got solid nice aquire and connection between two stationary hosts.

You could also transfer files across with a forking C program (or other language) that spawned a shell process and FTP’ing from there. Then use opendir() to scan your FTP directory and read the data there. I mean if you need more than just stock serial comm.