Unique identifier in DMSoC and SoC?

It is not up to me to read the die ID or not. Nor am I paranoid. I am asking whether both BBs have an UUID and if so, how to hide the die ID and keep it hidden to protect the processor from being hacked and infected with firmware rootkits.

In the 1990s, manufacturers installed an UUID or die ID in processors to enable e-commerce and years later, digital rights management, to universally identify computers on the internet and track them.

Due to multiple OS on the market and Windows loosing its share, hackers are going away from hacking the OS to hacking the processor. Hacking the processor allows the hacker to gain full control on the kernel level. See:

http://www.theinquirer.net/inquirer/news/2185052/intel-cpu-flaw-vulnerable-hacker-attacks

http://www.infoworld.com/d/security-central/researcher-demonstrate-attack-code-intel-chips-036

http://www.networkworld.com/news/2010/020210-black-hat-processor-security.html

Firmware rootkits also allow the hacker to gain full control on the kernel level. See articles on the mebromi firmare rootkit such http://blog.webroot.com/2011/09/13/mebromi-the-first-bios-rootkit-in-the-wild/ and apcmag.com/cpu_virus_can_attack_amd_intel_cpus.htm

Initially, my abuser’s hackers infected my Windows OS. I switched to Linux. They infected Linux. I switched to Fedora and connecting to the internet with live DVDs. His hackers hacked my CUP and gained complete control of my netbooks. They infected my BIOS and graphic cards with firmware rootkits.

Hence, I am asking how to hide the die ID and keep it hidden? Alternately, does anyone know of a single board that does not have an UUID?

Easy, patch the linux kernel yourself and disable reading the die ID
to userspace...

Regards,

freebirds@hushmail.com wrote:

It is not up to me to read the die ID or not. Nor am I paranoid. I am asking whether both BBs have an UUID and if so,
how to hide the die ID and keep it hidden to protect the processor from being hacked and infected with firmware rootkits.

yes, they have a unique ID. it is up to the SW running on the board
to read and expose it. if you do not trust the SW running on
it, then nobody cannot assure you that it wont be read.

whether somebody is going to target you with a beagleboard
specific rootkit that will expose your unique ID, I cannot
say...

Robert Nelson replied: “Easy, patch the linux kernel yourself and disable reading the die ID to userspace”

This would not be easy for me to do. I am not a programmer. Is there a tutorial on this?

Vladimir wrote: “yes, they have a unique ID. it is up to the SW running on the board to read and expose it. if you do not trust the SW running on it, then nobody cannot assure you that it wont be read.”

Vladimir, what do you mean by SW? Do you mean OS? How to program the SW not to read and export die id?

normally, the Linux kernel reads the die-id and makes it available
to user space via some /proc/ entry. that is something that can be
disabled. Still with such a kernel, there is no guarantee that there
won't ever by some exploit/hack or whatever to still access it somehow.
You would need to trust the SW you are running.

What I do not understand in your fear of the UUID is, if you
are infected with a virus/trojan that can read the UUID and
transmit it elsewhere, this virus/trojan could do much worse
things like monitor your keyboard/screen etc.. So having your
UUID sent somewhere should be the least of your worries.