[beagleboard] Learning - Different Direction - Dallas 18B20 tutorial - HipsterCircuits

TMP36 Tutorial:

http://hipstercircuits.com/dallas-one-wire-temperature-reading-on-beaglebone-black-with-dto/

Not much problem getting this up and working.

Compared to Raspberry Pi, it's simpler, straightforward.

Problems I've been having are editing using Nano.

It screws up the text.

I've tried it on my local laptop. Not a problem.

Vim works better - for me.

When I scroll over the text in Nano, it screws it up. I get gibberish.

That doesn't happen using Vim. Although, I did have to learn how to
navigate, edit, and save in Vim. Not difficult, but, something I would've
rather not had to do.

Also, in setting up and running the Dallas 189B20 program, in Celsius or
Farenheit.
The temperatures correspond accurately - i.e. 33.25 Celsius accurately
converts
to about 91 degrees Farenheit. That tells me the math is right.

However, when my home thermometer reports: 74% Farenheit. Needless to
say, it appears to be more than a little inaccurate.

I've also tried the TMP36 (with better results):

http://learn.adafruit.com/measuring-temperature-with-a-beaglebone-black/overview

Not sure what accounts for the temperature differential using the Dallas
18B20 or
the editing problems using Nano vs Vim.

Just wanted to share my observations / experiences.

TMP36 Tutorial:

http://hipstercircuits.com/dallas-one-wire-temperature-reading-on-beaglebone-black-with-dto/

Not much problem getting this up and working.

Compared to Raspberry Pi, it's simpler, straightforward.

Problems I've been having are editing using Nano.

It screws up the text.

I've tried it on my local laptop. Not a problem.

Vim works better - for me.

When I scroll over the text in Nano, it screws it up. I get gibberish.

That doesn't happen using Vim. Although, I did have to learn how to
navigate, edit, and save in Vim. Not difficult, but, something I would've
rather not had to do.

Also, in setting up and running the Dallas 189B20 program, in Celsius or Farenheit.
The temperatures correspond accurately - i.e. 33.25 Celsius accurately converts
to about 91 degrees Farenheit. That tells me the math is right.

However, when my home thermometer reports: 74% Farenheit. Needless to
say, it appears to be more than a little inaccurate.

Don't forget that the bone itself gets hot and that heat will leech into the wires of your sensor. I needed >15cm of wire to get rid of that effect when using a ds18b20 sensor