What's the easiest way to update kernel?

Is there a straightforward way to update a BBB kernel? Standard Linux
systems manage it with "apt-update;apt-upgrade" so why not BBB? Even
RPi manages it so it's not down to size/space.

Is there a straightforward way to update a BBB kernel? Standard Linux

Yes: https://elinux.org/Beagleboard:BeagleBoneBlack_Debian#Kernel_Options

systems manage it with "apt-update;apt-upgrade" so why not BBB? Even
RPi manages it so it's not down to size/space.

RPi also has a large team of payed software engineers.

It also has more cores (4) thus they can waste cpu-cycles.

They also "force" you to upgrade your kernel.. :wink:

We've got users on 3.8.x, 4.4.x, 4.9.x, 4.14.x, 4.19.x, including
no-SMP, SMP, NON-RT, RT and Xenomai kernel variants, all still
working, with no payed developers. Then the whole UIO vs
REMOTEPROC_PRUSS too..

Personally, i like having the kernel NOT tied to the root file system,
it allows you to better optimeze for YOUR system.

Regards,

>
> Is there a straightforward way to update a BBB kernel? Standard Linux

Yes: https://elinux.org/Beagleboard:BeagleBoneBlack_Debian#Kernel_Options

Ah, OK, I hadn't found that before. Fairly straightforward, just not
automatic to latest/newest kernel. Thank you.

> systems manage it with "apt-update;apt-upgrade" so why not BBB? Even
> RPi manages it so it's not down to size/space.

RPi also has a large team of payed software engineers.

It also has more cores (4) thus they can waste cpu-cycles.

They also "force" you to upgrade your kernel.. :wink:

We've got users on 3.8.x, 4.4.x, 4.9.x, 4.14.x, 4.19.x, including
no-SMP, SMP, NON-RT, RT and Xenomai kernel variants, all still
working, with no payed developers. Then the whole UIO vs
REMOTEPROC_PRUSS too..

Personally, i like having the kernel NOT tied to the root file system,
it allows you to better optimeze for YOUR system.

Oops, sorry, did I touch a nerve? :slight_smile:

Anyway, are there any particular reasons for going for any specific
kernel other than the latest? Presumably 3.8.x will start getting
less support (if it hasn't already).

Currently the top two kernels are v4.4.x-rt and v4.14.x (v4.14.x is the default)

So far, v4.4.x-rt users seem to be happy with v4.19.x-rt

v4.19.x should be the default by buster's release.

Regards,

There are certain apps that behave very differently with various kernels. I know my application does not work nearly as well with the “-ti” kernels but works perfectly with the “-bone” kernels. We’ve had major issues with 4.19 (looks like that is getting resolved soon). The -rt and non-rt kernels have various uses cases where they are either needed or should not be used. Boot times are also affected by the kernel selection. So yes, there are definite reasons for being able to control exactly which kernel is used on your device.

I just run some simple Python scripts that read values from the analog
inputs and also use one of the serial ports. Speed really isn't an
issue, nor is start-up time. I do depend on a lot of standard stuff
like ssh and resync though to transfer data. Thus I want as
default/standard Debian as possible.